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Primary Care Foundation Blog

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Posted by on in Primary Care Foundation Blog

I have sympathy for anyone interviewed on television - I bet I would get it wrong!

But Keith Willett's claim needs correcting. He says: “We know that 15% of people that tried last year to get a GP appointment were unable to achieve one in the time they wanted and half of these turned up at an Urgent Care Centre or A&E”

 A quick sense check reveals this can't be right:
• There are about 300 Million GP consultations a year, roughly 5.5 times a year that we go to our GP
• 15% of 300 Million is 45 Million
• Half of that figure is 22.5 Million
• This is larger than the total number of attendances at A&E, MIU, WIC and UCCs in England which is reported to be 21.7 Million

I feel sure that he was referring to the GP Patient Survey results. If he had said: “The GP patient survey showed that 15% of people that tried last year to get a GP appointment were not able to get one or were offered an inconvenient one and 10% of these said that they turned up at an Urgent Care Centre or A&E” he would have been pretty much spot on.

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The Primary Care Foundation supports the development of best practice in primary and urgent care. We apply our work shaping national policy to support local change. We use information to create understanding, driving improvements in care, reducing unnecessary variation across organisations and between clinicians and developing practical tools for front-line staff in general practice and urgent care.