Urgent care: a practical guide to transforming same-day care in general practice (May 2009)

You can download an electronic version of the report here: Urgent Care Report

Also link to HSJ article by Kaye McIntosh: HSJ Article

This report is supported by a broad coalition of influential bodies, including the Royal College of General Practitioners and the British Medical Association’s GPs Committee (see their letter at the front of the report), the NHS Alliance and Primary Care Contracting, as well as being funded and supported by the Department of Health.

Urgent care in general practice has not had the same policy focus compared to high profile policy areas such as hospital emergency care and managing long-term conditions. Yet responding efficiently to demand for same-day care brings significant benefits for patients, practices and for the wider healthcare system.  Primary care commissioners must tackle the major issues presented by emergency admissions if commissioning strategies are to be deemed successful.

This report throws a spotlight on the differing ways urgent care is, and can be, managed in day-to-day general practice, offering key insights into how we can all improve our patients’ care and access making best use of existing resources and identifying areas and practices that require additional resources.. There are real-life examples of better management of urgent care making a difference: reducing attendance at A&E and emergency hospital admissions, offering a better service to patients and enabling GPs and primary care staff to take control of their workload.

It offers practical advice and support to practice managers and GPs across the country. Rather than setting national targets that inevitably fail to reflect the unique patient population, geography, and skill mix of individual practices, it encourages them to look at their own processes, make changes and set their own realistic and appropriate local standard, within their available resources.

About Us

The Primary Care Foundation supports the development of best practice in primary and urgent care. We apply our work shaping national policy to support local change. We use information to create understanding, driving improvements in care, reducing unnecessary variation across organisations and between clinicians and developing practical tools for front-line staff in general practice and urgent care.